How to Make an Amazing Cloud Lamp Using Really Simple Materials

Contents
  1. Tip: 5 steps to great renders from Lumion (2019 Update)
  2. 20 Cloud Lamps That’ll Fill Your Home with Flashes of Thunder
  3. # How about a floating cloud Bluetooth speaker that can set your desk alight while playing your favorite music and floating in the air? It is designed by Richard Clarkson and Studio Crealev. The specialty of the floating cloud lamp are the built-in Bluetooth speaker and sound-reactive LED lights that deliver close-to-reality effect of thunder and rain. It uses magnetic levitation to float over its oval base. It costs ,620
  4. # These attractive paper pendant lamps can spruce up any home interiors. Japan-based 24-Degree Studio makes these Airy lampshades from tear proof and washable laminated Japanese rice paper. Inspired by lightweight form of clouds, this lamp collection can add stylish touch to any living space. Price staring from at 24-Degree Studio
  5. # New York-based designer Richard Clarkson created this amazing audio-visual cloud-shaped pendant lamp. With built-in lights and speaker, it offers a cool lightening effect and roars of a real thunderstorm. Amazing, isn’t it?
  6. # Designed by Italian architect and designer Mario Bellini for Nemo Lighting, the Nuvola suspended lamp is made of  natural opal polyethylene. The shape of cloud helps it creating a dreamy atmosphere
  7. # Designed by Andreas Hopf and Axel Nordin, this cloud- ceiling lamp will look great above a dining table. Each pendant has a brass panel underneath that emits light in a unique, angular pattern that mimics a sliced meteorite
  8. # Designed by New York based Apparatus Studio, this cloud lamp is made of glass orbs frosted by hand. There are central light sources emitting a soft glow that is refracted through the cluster of orbs. Available in three versions with different number of glass orbs
  9. # Margje Teeuwen in collaboration with Erwin Zwiers created the Proplamp. The best thing about the cloud suspension lamp is that it is made of recyclable nonwoven material, which allows it to be reshaped over and over again. Means you can crush it to tailor-make your own design
  10. # This cloud lamp is designed by Frank Owen Gehry for the Swiss lighting brand Belux. Each lamp comes with a paper- shade with an invisible light source in the centre. These lamps are available in different sizes and models
  11. # This is a cool idea to repurpose old soft toys at home. A DIYer shared an Instructable to make this mushroom cloud lamp from cotton, hard wire, and light bulb. Cool, isn’t it?
  12. # Designed and made in Holland, the Jacob pendant lamp is made of laser-cut Polypropylene triangles. The lamp is adjustable and you can change the shape by moving the triangles. Each unit has two cords, allowing you to make two smaller lamps
  13. # French designer Mathieu Lehanneur made this  glass-blown lamp. Extremely complex steel molds are used to give cloud-inspired shape to the glass lampshade
  14. # Designed by Lilly Ingenhoven, Cloud 9 is a wall-mounted light designed for Copenhagen-based lighting company Sygns. It is part of the series “Le Petit Prince” that draws inspiration from the same titled book by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. This cloud-shaped neon light has identical references to characters in the book
  15. # This pendant lamp in shape of cloud is designed by Toyo Ito for Italian lighting company Rotaliana. It made of five thin amoeba-shaped acrylic plastic layers, piled one on top of the other, and cut in an amoebic shape
  16. # This feathery cloud lamp is designed by Tilen Sepič. He designed it as part of the Lighting guerrilla workshop in LjubljanaIt. It is a beautiful ceiling lamp that combines aesthetics with functionality
  17. # Inspired by the poem of Xu Zhimo, the Chinese designer Zhao Liping conceived this cute cloud lamp. He designed a floor and a pendant version
  18. # Made from thin 1mm translucent APET plastic, this cloud-shaped lamp is designed by Adamlamp. The unique structure consists of triangle mesh system. It provides diffused light to enhance home settings
  19. # Designed by Wout Wessemius, Le Nuage is a handmade pendant lamp in shape of a cloud. Each lamp is made of polyester wadding. It serves both decorative and functional purposes
  20. # Caitlind r.c. Brown and Wayne Garrett designed and installed this cloud-esque lighting installation in the Progress Bar in Chicago. It uses motion sensors and more than 15,000 light bulbs
  21. # This is a custom hand-sculpted lighting installation by Graypants at Airbnb headquarters in San Francisco. The cloud chandelier is made of 25,000 Ping-Pong balls, each attached by hand to make it look a glowing cloud
  22. # Canadian artists Caitlind r.c. Brown & Wayne Garrett made this interactive light installtion. This cloud-shaped sculpture is made of 6,000 incandescent lights!
  23. 63 Easy Science Experiments for Kids Using Household Stuff
  24. Coolest Science Experiments for Kids at Home
  25. Fun Science Experiments Using Household Staples
  26. Slime, Putty, and Oobleck Science Experiments for Kids
  27. Outdoor and Nature Science Experiments
  28. Science Experiments for Kids that Fizz, Bubble, and Foam
  29. Physics and Physical Science Experiments for Kids
  30. More Easy Science Experiments for Kids
  31. 20+ DIY Night Light Ideas For Kids
  32. DIY Firefly Lamp
  33. DIY Mason Jar Night Light
  34. DIY Fairy House Night Lights
  35. DIY Fairy Lantern Tutorial
  36. String Lights Above Bed
  37. DIY Animal Lamp
  38. DIY Swan Nightlight For About
  39. Star Ceiling Light
  40. DIY Glowing Fairy Bottle
  41. DIY Hot Air Balloon Lamps
  42. Baby Birdhouse Lamp
  43. DIY Snowman Night Light For Christmas
  44. Easy Firefly Nightlight
  45. DIY Flower Lights Using Egg Cartons
  46. DIY Flower Lights
  47. DIY Light-Up Flower Frame Backdrop
  48. DIY Ping Pong Ball Night Lights
  49. DIY Fabric Star Lights
  50. DIY Glitter Fairy Mason Jar Light
  51. DIY Mason Jar Luminaries
  52. DIY Constellation Jar
  53. DIY Cloud Light

Tip: 5 steps to great renders from Lumion (2019 Update)

How to Make an Amazing Cloud Lamp Using Really Simple Materials

You’ve finished your 3D model and imported it into Lumion. Now, it’s time to make it look great. With all of Lumion’s functionality just inviting you to transform your 3D model into a beautiful render, it can be difficult to know where to start. This blog gives you step-by-step hints of what you can do.

Villa, rendered in Lumion 9.5 by Gui Felix.

As intuitive and dependable 3D rendering software, Lumion makes it easy to quickly breathe life into your designs.

Simply imagine how you want to show your design, and you’ll find a wide range of easy-to-apply tools, features and effects. But before you start building a scene and rendering, there are a few questions you should answer first — 1) how do you want to artistically communicate your model and designs, and 2) how can you make it happen in Lumion?

Building an artistically compelling image or animation of your designs requires a vision of what you want to achieve. To enhance that vision in your mind, some questions to ask yourself may include:

  1. What emotions do you want to convey?
  2. Are you going for light and colorful, grey and bleak, or something else?
  3. Should the images look realistic or sketchy?
  4. Which parts of the building are you trying to emphasize?

To help streamline the development of your renders, we’ve provided 5 tried-and-true tips for transforming blank 3D models into beautiful, compelling images and videos.

  • Use at least one composition rule when framing and finding a camera angle for your image renders. Just a few of these rules include ‘simplify the scene,’ ‘use leading lines,’ ‘be creative with colors,’ and so on.
  • When making an animation, set the camera height to the human eye level. The camera angle shouldn’t be too wide so as to avoid perspective distortion.

Interior wave lounge, rendered in Lumion 9 by ‎Kamon Tangruen.

  • Find the best position for the sun so that it draws attention to the parts of the building that you want to highlight. You can use the “Sun Study” effect to accurately simulate the sun location at a particular location, time and date. Other effects such as the “Sun” effect and the “Real Skies” can help you control the environmental lighting in your design.
  • Add interior and mood lighting. Even if the scene you want to show takes place during the daytime, interior and mood lighting can subtly communicate that the building is being used. You can also use volumetric lighting for an extra atmospheric feeling.
  • Balance the shadow brightness and coloring with the context surrounding the building. For example, outdoor shadows tend to show with a bluer color.
  • Avoid a high level of contrast in non-important areas. This is because high-contrast areas can sometimes direct attention to the wrong points in your design.

Villa in UAE, rendered in Lumion 9 by CRIO Design Studio in collaboration with Arch. Alaa Hossari.

  • When rendering, enable “Speedray reflections” and put reflection planes on big, flat surfaces.
  • Tweak the glossiness slider of the floor and ceiling materials. In many cases, making your materials a little more reflective will work better than static, non-reflective surfaces.
  • Do not use simple digital colors, include plain green, red, blue, purple, yellow. These simple digital colors can look ugly when applied to materials. Consider using a more natural (and more realistic) color palette for the entire scene.
  • Sometimes it is better to replace diffuse textures with plain colors (using the top slider in the material editor) and use bumps but without maximal intensity.
  • Consider showing a little age and weathering with the “Weathering” slider, located in Lumion’s material editor.

GIF showing various wall materials, many of which were included in the Lumion 9.5 update.

  • Use the “Color Correction” effect (especially the first slider — Temperature) as it adjusts the color tone of the image and adds dark shadows where necessary.
  • Add a little bit of “Chromatic Aberration” and a very tiny value of the “Fish Eye” effect for a small, optical imperfection.
  • Add “Sky Light” and “Hyperlight” for still images and videos. For the most impact with Sky Light, turn the Sky Light render quality to ultra (which also means “ultra-slow render speeds”).
  • Use the “Sharpness” effect and set the slider to a low value to make the picture look a bit more ‘flat,’ as if were printed on a piece of paper.
  • “Depth-of-Field” (DOF) is really useful for narrow camera angles. Generally, you shouldn’t use this effect if you have wide camera angles.
  • Always add reflections to water and glass planes.

Lumion Pro contains a wide variety of effects to help stylize and improve the look and feel of renders. In the above slideshow, you can explore how we created the leading image of this blog post with Lumion effects.

  • Furniture is very important for interiors and exteriors. Select and add furniture models from the Lumion object library and fill out some empty spaces. The idea is to make the spaces look “lived-in,” where you show how people might use a building, home, public space, etc.
  • Cars are really effective models when forming the “border areas” of a still render or a movie frame. Try to avoid having cars in the center of your composition.
  • By including people models in your render, you can easily show your audience how you’ve envisioned the relationship between people and a building design. Nevertheless, make sure that your people don’t dominate the render. Their faces should not be too visible so that you don’t distract viewers from the model design. Using silhouettes from the library is a good way to achieve this neutrality with the scene’s people models.
  • You can effectively create picture borders and backgrounds with trees and plants from the content library.
  • Remember that the background of your scene has a huge impact on the look of your building design. Even if the background is blurry, having the feeling of a real city or forest in the background can enhance the realism of the scene while making the entire render easier for the viewer to understand and digest.
  • While the “Real Skies” are beautiful and realistic, they can distract the viewer from the building in some cases. If you feel that the skies are distracting, you have a couple options. For one, you can use one of the “clear” Real Skies or you can add the Sky and Clouds effect and turn up the “cloud softness” slider to blur the clouds. Another option is to turn off any cloud effect and adjust the “clouds” slider in Lumion’s Build Mode to create a distraction-free, clear sky. Below, you can find a picture showing the difference between “no clouds” in Lumion and the clear Real Skies.

Urban Scene, rendered in Lumion 9.5 by Edwin Perez Cortez.

Source: https://lumion.com/blog/tip-5-steps-to-great-renders-from-lumion.html

20 Cloud Lamps That’ll Fill Your Home with Flashes of Thunder

How to Make an Amazing Cloud Lamp Using Really Simple Materials

Clouds are the most beautiful creation of nature. They are mostly associated with weightlessness and emotions – whether happiness, sadness or imagination. Everyone tries to find their favorite character in them.

They appear white cotton balls drifting across the blue sky in slow motion. Continuously changing dimensions and forms make them a perfect source of inspiration for designers seeking out new design ideas.

 A lamp inspired by the fluffy form of clouds is a great example.

The cloud lamps are a great centerpiece for any room. They are so beautiful that you will definitely end up buying or creating one.

Here is a collection of some of the most awesome cloud lamps designed to bring flashes and peals of thunder to space.

# How about a floating cloud Bluetooth speaker that can set your desk alight while playing your favorite music and floating in the air? It is designed by Richard Clarkson and Studio Crealev. The specialty of the floating cloud lamp are the built-in Bluetooth speaker and sound-reactive LED lights that deliver close-to-reality effect of thunder and rain. It uses magnetic levitation to float over its oval base. It costs $4,620

Image: Crealev/Richard Clarkson

Image: Crealev/Richard Clarkson

Image: Crealev/Richard Clarkson

Image: Crealev/Richard Clarkson

Image: Crealev/Richard Clarkson

Image: Crealev/Richard Clarkson

Image: Crealev/Richard Clarkson

Image: Crealev/Richard Clarkson

Image: Crealev/Richard Clarkson

Image: Crealev/Richard Clarkson

# These attractive paper pendant lamps can spruce up any home interiors. Japan-based 24-Degree Studio makes these Airy lampshades from tear proof and washable laminated Japanese rice paper. Inspired by lightweight form of clouds, this lamp collection can add stylish touch to any living space. Price staring from $70 at 24-Degree Studio

Image: 24-Degree Studio

Image: 24-Degree Studio

Image: 24-Degree Studio

Image: 24-Degree Studio

Image: 24-Degree Studio

Image: 24-Degree Studio

Image: 24-Degree Studio

Image: 24-Degree Studio

Image: 24-Degree Studio

# New York-based designer Richard Clarkson created this amazing audio-visual cloud-shaped pendant lamp. With built-in lights and speaker, it offers a cool lightening effect and roars of a real thunderstorm. Amazing, isn’t it?

Image: Richard Clarkson

Image: Richard Clarkson

Image: Richard Clarkson

Image: Richard Clarkson

# Designed by Italian architect and designer Mario Bellini for Nemo Lighting, the Nuvola suspended lamp is made of  natural opal polyethylene. The shape of cloud helps it creating a dreamy atmosphere

Image: Nemo Lighting

Image: Nemo Lighting

Image: Nemo Lighting

Image: Nemo Lighting

Image: Nemo Lighting

Image: Nemo Lighting

Image: Nemo Lighting

# Designed by Andreas Hopf and Axel Nordin, this cloud- ceiling lamp will look great above a dining table. Each pendant has a brass panel underneath that emits light in a unique, angular pattern that mimics a sliced meteorite

Image: Hopf Nordin

Image: Hopf Nordin

Image: Hopf Nordin

Image: Hopf Nordin

Image: Hopf Nordin

# Designed by New York based Apparatus Studio, this cloud lamp is made of glass orbs frosted by hand. There are central light sources emitting a soft glow that is refracted through the cluster of orbs. Available in three versions with different number of glass orbs

Image: Apparatus Studio

Image: Apparatus Studio

Image: Apparatus Studio

Image: Apparatus Studio

# Margje Teeuwen in collaboration with Erwin Zwiers created the Proplamp. The best thing about the cloud suspension lamp is that it is made of recyclable nonwoven material, which allows it to be reshaped over and over again. Means you can crush it to tailor-make your own design

Image: Proplamp

Image: Proplamp

Image: Proplamp

Image: Proplamp

Image: Proplamp

Image: Proplamp

Image: Proplamp

# This cloud lamp is designed by Frank Owen Gehry for the Swiss lighting brand Belux. Each lamp comes with a paper- shade with an invisible light source in the centre. These lamps are available in different sizes and models

Image: Ambiente Direct

Image: Ambiente Direct

Image: Ambiente Direct

Image: Belux

Image: Belux

# This is a cool idea to repurpose old soft toys at home. A DIYer shared an Instructable to make this mushroom cloud lamp from cotton, hard wire, and light bulb. Cool, isn’t it?

Image: Instructables

Image: Instructables

Image: Instructables

Image: Instructables

Image: Instructables

# Designed and made in Holland, the Jacob pendant lamp is made of laser-cut Polypropylene triangles. The lamp is adjustable and you can change the shape by moving the triangles. Each unit has two cords, allowing you to make two smaller lamps

Image: studio met

Image: studio met

Image: studio met

Image: studio met

# French designer Mathieu Lehanneur made this  glass-blown lamp. Extremely complex steel molds are used to give cloud-inspired shape to the glass lampshade

Image: Mathieu Lehanneur

Image: Mathieu Lehanneur

Image: Mathieu Lehanneur

Image: Mathieu Lehanneur

# Designed by Lilly Ingenhoven, Cloud 9 is a wall-mounted light designed for Copenhagen-based lighting company Sygns. It is part of the series “Le Petit Prince” that draws inspiration from the same titled book by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. This cloud-shaped neon light has identical references to characters in the book

Image: sygns

Image: sygns

Image: sygns

Image: sygns

# This pendant lamp in shape of cloud is designed by Toyo Ito for Italian lighting company Rotaliana. It made of five thin amoeba-shaped acrylic plastic layers, piled one on top of the other, and cut in an amoebic shape

Image: Rotaliana LIghting

Image: Rotaliana LIghting

Image: Rotaliana LIghting

Image: Rotaliana LIghting

# This feathery cloud lamp is designed by Tilen Sepič. He designed it as part of the Lighting guerrilla workshop in LjubljanaIt. It is a beautiful ceiling lamp that combines aesthetics with functionality

Image: Tilen Sepič

Image: Tilen Sepič

Image: Tilen Sepič

Image: Tilen Sepič

Image: Tilen Sepič

Image: Tilen Sepič

# Inspired by the poem of Xu Zhimo, the Chinese designer Zhao Liping conceived this cute cloud lamp. He designed a floor and a pendant version

Image: Zhao Liping

Image: Zhao Liping

Image: Zhao Liping

# Made from thin 1mm translucent APET plastic, this cloud-shaped lamp is designed by Adamlamp. The unique structure consists of triangle mesh system. It provides diffused light to enhance home settings

Image: Behance/Adamlamp

Image: Behance/Adamlamp

Image: Behance/Adamlamp

Image: Behance/Adamlamp

Image: Behance/Adamlamp

Image: Behance/Adamlamp

# Designed by Wout Wessemius, Le Nuage is a handmade pendant lamp in shape of a cloud. Each lamp is made of polyester wadding. It serves both decorative and functional purposes

Image: Wout Wessemius

Image: Wout Wessemius

Image: Wout Wessemius

Image: Wout Wessemius

Image: Wout Wessemius

Image: Wout Wessemius

Image: Wout Wessemius

# Caitlind r.c. Brown and Wayne Garrett designed and installed this cloud-esque lighting installation in the Progress Bar in Chicago. It uses motion sensors and more than 15,000 light bulbs

Image: Caitlind r.c. Brown & Wayne Garrett

Image: Caitlind r.c. Brown & Wayne Garrett

Image: Caitlind r.c. Brown & Wayne Garrett

Image: Caitlind r.c. Brown & Wayne Garrett

Image: Caitlind r.c. Brown & Wayne Garrett

# This is a custom hand-sculpted lighting installation by Graypants at Airbnb headquarters in San Francisco. The cloud chandelier is made of 25,000 Ping-Pong balls, each attached by hand to make it look a glowing cloud

Image: Graypants

Image: Graypants

Image: Graypants

Image: Graypants

Image: Graypants

# Canadian artists Caitlind r.c. Brown & Wayne Garrett made this interactive light installtion. This cloud-shaped sculpture is made of 6,000 incandescent lights!

Image: Caitlind r.c. Brown & Wayne Garret

Image: Caitlind r.c. Brown & Wayne Garret

Image: Caitlind r.c. Brown & Wayne Garret

Image: Caitlind r.c. Brown & Wayne Garret

Image: Caitlind r.c. Brown & Wayne Garret

Source: https://www.homecrux.com/20-cloud-lamps-thatll-fill-your-home-with-flashes-and-peals-of-thunder/77487/

63 Easy Science Experiments for Kids Using Household Stuff

How to Make an Amazing Cloud Lamp Using Really Simple Materials

Searching for kid-friendly science experiments to do at home? Whether you're prepping for a fifth-grade science fair or want something fun to do with preschoolers, these cool science experiments for kids are super easy and a lot of fun for kids of all ages. Who knows, mom and dad may end up learning a new thing or two, too.

Besides, children are born scientists. They're always experimenting with something, whether they're throwing a plate of spaghetti on the wall, blowing bubbles in the bathwater, or stacking blocks into an intricate tower only to destroy it in one big swipe.

As they get older, you may decide to enroll them in a FREE online coding class to get a leg up in today's digital world, a STEM summer camp, or work together on their very first (or final) science fair project.

But you can actually do some pretty mind-blowing, hands-on science experiments at home using stuff you probably have lying around the house.

Find more STEM fun for kids of all ages in our STEM and Science Experiments for Kids Guide.

We're also big fans of science kits that deliver all the materials you need (and instructions!) in one box. Here are a few of our favorites that you might want to stock up on: All of the Thames and Kosmos kits, including the awesome Robotics Workshop, Crystal Growing kit, and the Electricity and Magnetism kit.

The Elenco Snap Circuits kit can get young engineers going, as can a number of the Lego Robotics or Lego Gadget kits. Build a Solar Rover with 3M's science kit, and the youngest scientists might start with Playz Explosive Kitchen Lab or National Geographic's science kits, including the Build Your Own Volcano.

Coolest Science Experiments for Kids at Home

Kids can make their own sweet treat with this science experiment: rock candy in a glass. Photo courtesy of Wikivisuals

1. Learn about the crystallization process by growing rock candy in a glass.

2. Make a lava lamp by pouring vegetable oil into water and then adding an alka-seltzer tablet to make the blob of oil move.

3. Borax plus glue equals homemade slime.

4. Blow bubbles outside when temperatures dip to the single digits and watch them freeze.

5. Use lemon juice to make invisible ink that can only be seen when held up to a heat source.

6. Use food coloring and water to make a walking rainbow and explore how combining primary colors makes secondary colors.

Scram pepper! Soap chases the intruder in this science experiment.

7. Dish soap, pepper, a toothpick, and a little bit of water are all kids need to feel science wizards. Watch a little drop of soap chase pepper away in the Pepper & Soap Experiment.

8. Create carbon dioxide and hang on while you use it to fill up a balloon.

Fun Science Experiments Using Household Staples

9. Build a marshmallow catapult  a plastic spoon, rubber bands, and Popsicle sticks.

10. Use a plastic bag and cup to build a parachute for a light toy.

11. Place white flowers in colored water and watch how they soak up the hues.

Fizzy lemons are an easy all-ages science experiment.

12. Create a colorful and fizzy reaction by adding a drop of food coloring and a little baking soda to a sliced lemon. 

13. Make your own butter by shaking a jar of heavy cream.

14. Make homemade ice cream in a bag: shake salt, ice, cream, and sugar vigorously until the consistency is right, then enjoy.

15. Plop oil into water to see that they really don't mix; try it with a variety of liquids to make a rainbow of stripes.

RELATED: 25 Exercise Games to Do with Kids Indoors

Make sure an adult lights the candle for this amazing egg in a bottle science experiment. Photo courtesy of Wikivisuals

16. Force an egg to fit into a bottle by creating a suction using heat.

17. Change how an egg floats or sinks in a glass by adding salt to the water.

18. Turn milk into a material that acts plastic using white vinegar.

19. Mix a batch of bread dough and separate it into several different bowls; place them in different places (outside, inside, in the dark, in the light) to see which environment yeast thrives in.

20. Grow mold on bread by putting slices in different environments (in a bag in the dark, in a bag in the sunlight, out in the open, in the refrigerator); see which one gets moldy first.

21. Have your kids close their eyes and hold their nose and see if they can still identify foods by taste.

22. Dabble in some kitchen science while making this yummy ricotta cheese.

Watch vinegar dissolve the shell of an egg!

23. Your egg will be so embarrassed when you leave it naked! Dissolve the shell right off an egg by simply placing it in a cup of vinegar.

24. Map taste buds by dipping Q-tips into different flavors and placing them on different areas of your tongue.

25. Explore the fat content of different foods by wiping them on a brown paper bag; fatty foods leave behind a greasy spot, while fruits and vegetables leave no trace at all.

Slime, Putty, and Oobleck Science Experiments for Kids

This soft, non-slimy putty even cleans your hands. Now that's a mom-approved science experiment.

26. You will be squeaky clean after creating this satisfying non-sticky putty by simply combining cornstarch and dish soap.

27. Whip up some Oobleck, a fascinating non-Newtonian fluid that can act a solid or a liquid depending on certain conditions.

28. Microwave Ivory soap (or any soap that floats) to create a bizarre puffy soufflé.

Outdoor and Nature Science Experiments

29. Grow a bean in a clear cup to watch the roots grow down and the stem grow up.

30. Craft a duck call by cutting the ends of a straw into a point, then blow.

31. Set up a row of bottles with varying amounts of liquid and then blow across the openings to hear the different tones.

32. Make a sundial by placing a stick in a vertical position and a circle of rocks around it marking each hour.

33. Cut ice in half using a fishing wire—the pressure melts the ice faster than the air.

34. Make a rainbow by holding a glass of water up to the sunlight with a sheet of paper behind it to catch the colors.

35. Create a tornado in a bottle by taping two plastic bottles together neck to neck—one filled, the other empty—and swirling it quickly.

36. S’more science please! Harness the power of the sun and turn a pizza box into a solar oven and roast some delicious treats for the whole family.

Science Experiments for Kids that Fizz, Bubble, and Foam

Make a beautiful volcano in your own kitchen!  Photo courtesy of Wikivisuals

37. Mix baking soda, vinegar, and glitter for a sparkly volcano.

38. Mix Diet Coke and Mentos and stand back to watch the explosion. (Really! Stand back.)

39. Drop Pop Rocks into a bottle of soda and then place a balloon onto the opening to watch it inflate.

40. Discover how to keep your pennies shiny by experimenting with different cleaning solutions. 

41. Make “elephant toothpaste” (a.k.a. an impressive large foam) soap, yeast, and hydrogen peroxide.

42. This glitter does more than shine, it sparks a scientific experiment to see how far germs can spread.

43. Baking soda and vinegar react to make these popcorn kernels hop around a jar of water. 

Physics and Physical Science Experiments for Kids

44. Learn about surface tension by dropping food coloring into milk and watch as the colors move when you add some soap.

45. Make a Rube Goldberg machine featuring a series of moving pieces that affect one another: marbles, dominoes, books, and most any surface.

46. Build a rocket balloon car using a Styrofoam tray, a balloon, and a straw; watch how air pressure moves it across the table.

47. Looking for hands-on science experiments? Ask your kids to do simple tasks with their hands, feet, and eyes ( grab a ball, stand on one foot, or wink) to see which side is dominant.

48. Test your reaction time by having a friend drop a ruler between two almost closed fingers. See how fast you can grab it.

49. Explore the scientific concept of density while taking a bath. Ivory soap boats do more than just float, they demonstrate density.

RELATED: 40 Snow Day Boredom Busters for Kids

All ages can enjoy tower building.

50. Engineer a tall tower using red party cups and sheets of paper. How high can you go? 

51. Fold a paper airplane and then bend a corner to see how that changes its flight path.

52. Find your blind spot by moving a card with a speck on it until you can no longer see the spot.

53. Build a miniature windmill using a few simple objects. Watch it spin faster or slower the direction of the “blades.”

54. Bounce a ball on top of another to watch how the energy transfers to the top ball and leaves the bottom one “dead.”

55. Demonstrate centripetal force by spinning a bucket of water on a rope in a vertical circle.

More Easy Science Experiments for Kids

56. Build a container for an egg that protects it from breaking and then test it out by dropping it from on high.

57. Fashion your own bouncy balls with this recipe to see how various shapes bounce differently.

58. Use a balloon to amplify sound by holding it to your ear.

59. Budding meteorologists can create shaving cream storm clouds and Technicolor raindrops.

60. Make static electricity by rubbing balloons on clothing or shuffling on the carpet with socks, then zap someone with a quick touch.

Grow gummy bears with a special science solution.

61. These gummies won’t be so yummy in your tummy, but you can watch gummy bears grow by placing them in water, saltwater, and vinegar.

62. Build your own periscope using a milk container and carefully angled mirrors that allow you to see things above or behind you.

63. Be a DIY spy with this fun fingerprint experiment. Collect fingerprints using one of these methods, and then dive a little deeper with a forensic study of fingerprint patterns.

64. Fill a plastic bottle to the brim with water and put it in the freezer; in a few hours the bottle will crack because ice expands.

This article may contain some affiliate links, which means we might earn a small commission if you make a purchase. There is no extra cost to the reader. We only recommend products and services that we have personally used or have thoroughly researched.

This article was first published in 2014, but it has since been updated. Additional reporting and photos by Ally Noel except where noted.

Source: https://mommypoppins.com/kids/50-easy-science-experiments-for-kids-fun-educational-activities-using-household-stuff

20+ DIY Night Light Ideas For Kids

How to Make an Amazing Cloud Lamp Using Really Simple Materials

The cozy and colourful look of your kid’s bedroom is obviously incomplete without some shimmer and glow. Make your kids comfortable with the dark by installing in their rooms one or more of these beautiful and creative DIY nightlight ideas. These DIY lamps are not only fun to make but also very pretty to look at. They are a perfect way to boost your and your kid’s creativity.

Un many DIY crafts, these night lights do not require many fancy supplies, instead they just require the assembling of a couple of everyday stuff and taa daa they are ready to glow! Here is a compilation of 20+ unique and cost-effective ideas for DIY night lights and lamps that you will surely want to add to your kid’s room decor. Happy Crafting!

DIY Firefly Lamp

Remember collecting fire flies in jars as kids? Well you can now live those memories again and share them with your kids by making this cool DIY firefly lamp. This beautiful lantern style lamp with several pores for light can be easily made tin cans and spray paints. Cute for little kids’ bedrooms. Get the tutorial via casadecolorir.

DIY Mason Jar Night Light

This simple mason jar glitter lamp besides being fun to look at is also very cost effective and easy to make. This nightlight will surely add a nice shimmer and glow to your kid’s bedroom. Kids will enjoy the the magic glow of nightlights by their bed at night! Get the tutorial via modpodgerocksblog.

DIY Fairy House Night Lights

Want to put empty water bottles to the best use? Well then this adorable fairy house night light is just the thing for you. Made with simple supplies this nightlight will definitely be a worth it addition to your child’s bedroom decor! Fun for a child’s room or a nursery, or even the garden. Get the tutorial via craftsbyamanda.

DIY Fairy Lantern Tutorial

This DIY fairy tale lantern is guaranteed to give your kid’s bedroom a fairy tale look and make bed time exciting. Made with simple jars, glitter and artificial flowers, this nightlight is definitely a magic in bottle! Get the tutorial via craft.ideas2live4.

String Lights Above Bed

To give a starry night sky look to your kid’s room, install these easy DIY string night lights. These lights will definitely give the room a subtle and sublime night sky ambiance. Via buzzfeed.

DIY Animal Lamp

Made string lights and old fabric, this cute DIY animal lamp will definitely make night time an exciting adventure for your little one! Get the tutorial via matsutakeblog.

DIY Swan Nightlight For About $10

This easy and cost-effective swan night light made a swan shaped planet and string lights is destined to bring your little girl’s room to life! Your little princess would surely love this cute DIY nightlight. Get the tutorial via maizehutton.

Star Ceiling Light

Now you can bring the glistening constellations to your kid’s room by adding just a faux ceiling using foamcore. This ceiling night light will definitely brighten up the entire room!

DIY Glowing Fairy Bottle

For your little girl’s love of fairies you can easily make this DIY glowing fairy bottle and add a fairy tale affect to her room! Get the tutorial via melissaanddoug.

DIY Hot Air Balloon Lamps

If you are looking for the perfect cross between creativity and a night light, then this DIY hot air balloon night light is just the answer for you. Made easily available supplies this night light will definitely bring out your kid’s smile! Get the tutorial via alinakelo.

Baby Birdhouse Lamp

This baby birdhouse lamp is just the perfect addition for your baby’s nursery. A hybrid of carpentry, fun and creativity, this birdhouse night light is an absolute beauty! Buyable via etsy.

DIY Snowman Night Light For Christmas

This frozen themed night light is not only adorable to look at, but is also very easy to make. Staying in your budget you can easily install this cute night light in your Olaf loving kid’s bedroom! Get the tutorial via sunhatsandwellieboots.

Easy Firefly Nightlight

Made plastic eggs and everyday supplies these cute little firefly night lights are begging to light up your kid’s bedroom! Get the tutorial via apartmenttherapy.

DIY Flower Lights Using Egg Cartons

Are egg cartons piling up in your pantry? Well then grab them, paint them, cut them and turn them into these beautiful DIY flower lights. Get the tutorial via prakticideas.

DIY Flower Lights

These colourful DIY flower lights made paper cups and string lights are the perfect example of recycling and creativity. These lights will surely add colour to your decor! Get the tutorial via ohhappyday.

DIY Light-Up Flower Frame Backdrop

This beautiful backdrop made string lights and artificial flowers is not only easy to make, but is also very catchy to look at. This glowing backdrop is definite to give your room the perfect ambiance. Get the tutorial via lifeannstyle.

DIY Ping Pong Ball Night Lights

Pingpong balls and string lights are exactly the only supplies you need to make these beautiful DIY pingpong balls night lights. Add these cute lights to your room and enjoy the magical affect. Get the tutorial via sayyes.

DIY Fabric Star Lights

These adorable looking DIY star lights are exactly what you need for your little one’s room. These night lights are destined to not only add a glow to your kid’s room, but will also lighten up the entire bed time experience! Get the tutorial via auxpetitesmerveilles.

DIY Glitter Fairy Mason Jar Light

Make this glossy and glittery mason jar night light and bring to your princess’ room a glowing fairytale affect. Check out the easy tutorial on how to make this cute glitter mason jar light for kids’ bedrooms via allmommywants.

DIY Mason Jar Luminaries

These easy to make DIY mason jar luminaries are easy to make and amazing to look at. Make these night lights with easy supplies and enjoy the glow! Get the tutorial via dreamalittlebigger.

DIY Constellation Jar

Now captivate the stars in a jar with the help of these easy to create DIY constellation jar night lights and dwell in the starry affect! Get the tutorial via handimania.

DIY Cloud Light

Make these amazing DIY Cloud lights and bring to your kid’s room the close to nature affect of thunder and lightning. The string lights attached to the cotton clouds are definitely a sight to look at. Instal these in your kid’s room and let it rain! Get the tutorial via diyprojectsforteens.

Source: https://ideastand.com/diy-night-light-ideas-for-kids/