She Crocheted Her Stunning Wedding Dress Herself for Just $30… Find Out How

Contents
  1. Women share their secrets to repeating outfits Kate Middleton at the royal wedding
  2. Bride spends EIGHT months and just crocheting her wedding dress
  3. A bride tried on 6 dresses before finding the one, but then she had to postpone her wedding
  4. Sabina Leybold and Harsh Bhargav didn’t expect to each other
  5. The couple got engaged in January 2020
  6. Leybold started looking for a wedding dress a week after she got engaged
  7. Leybold also knew she wanted her dress to coordinate with the sherwani Bhargav would wear
  8. Leybold started shopping by ordering three dresses from Nordstrom to try on at home
  9. The second gown was supposed to be a white midi dress, but Leybold’s height made it shorter than she anticipated
  10. Leybold thought this gown was pretty, but it wasn’t as comfortable as she was hoping it would be
  11. So Leybold headed to a bridal shop with one friend to try on dresses
  12. Leybold was surprised to find herself drawn to this princess-style ball gown
  13. But when she tried on this fitted gown, Leybold knew she found something special
  14. The gown also had a dynamic shape on the back that Leybold was drawn to
  15. The gown needed a few alterations after Leybold bought it
  16. As the March wedding date approached, Leybold and Bhargav realized they wouldn’t be able to have their event as planned because of the coronavirus
  17. A few days after they postponed the wedding, Bhargav got the idea to have a photo shoot in their wedding attire before the couple had to self-isolate
  18. The shoot would give them a way to celebrate what should have been their wedding day
  19. “I would have never thought to do that,” Leybold said of the photo shoot
  20. The couple had a blast taking pictures together
  21. Leybold said the shoot was more fun because it felt a bit the last hurrah
  22. The couple officially got married in their home on April 11, 2020
  23. California man makes stunning wedding dress toilet paper
  24. These stunning wedding dresses are made toilet paper (yes, really!)
  25. Stuff We Love
  26. Wedding dress made toilet paper blows Hoda away!
  27. Royal wedding: Meet the designers of Meghan Markle's wedding dresses

Women share their secrets to repeating outfits Kate Middleton at the royal wedding

She Crocheted Her Stunning Wedding Dress Herself for Just $30... Find Out How

Moneyish

By Nicole Lyn Pesce

Published: May 20, 2018 11:21 pm ET

Even royalty repeats outfits.

The Duchess of Cambridge has graced many memorial services, christenings and weddings in designer dresses and coats that she has worn before.

And she even attended the royal wedding of her brother-in-law Prince Harry to Meghan Markle on Saturday wearing an off-white Alexander McQueen coat dress that she's already been photographed in twice before; including daughter Princess Charlotte's christening in 2015, and to the Queen's official birthday celebrations in 2016.

And she’s passing this on to her regal little ones. Kate Middleton shared her first photo of newborn Prince Louis being cradled by big sis Princess Charlotte this week.

And the pic was especially sweet because Louis was wearing the same white crocheted sweater that Charlotte wore in her first official baby photo — and Charlotte was wrapped in a cardigan that previously belonged to big brother Prince George.

Actress Tiffany Haddish has also unabashedly rocked the same white $4,000 Alexander McQueen dress several times: to the “Girls Trip” premiere in July 2017; while hosting “Saturday Night Live” in November 2017; and to the Oscars in February.

“I don't give a dang about no taboo, I spent a lot of money on this dress,” Haddish said during her “SNL” monologue. “This dress cost way more than my mortgage … Imma wear this dress multiple times.

If someone invites me to a bar or bat mitzvah, guess what I'm wearing to it? This Alexander McQueen.”

And Marchesa co-designer Georgina Chapman told Vogue in an interview published this week that she envisions her couture $5,000 to $13,000 gowns as “keepsakes,” to be worn “lots of times” — and passed down heirlooms. “We’re not doing disposable fashion,” she said.

This is something that commoners have been doing forever, of course, but seeing A-listers and a Duchess repeating looks is vindicating for women who wear their favorite pieces over again.

“If Kate Middleton can do it, we all can!” said Cherie Corso, 50, who told Moneyish she spent $3,500 on a white silk Max Mara suit for her second wedding 17 years ago, which she still wears all the time. “I just wore the blouse piece the other day to meet my daughter’s boyfriend — and my daughter even said, ‘Oh mommy, that always looks so good on you!’”

Plus, these beloved pieces carry a lot of sentimental value. “I truly believe that clothing carries energy,” added Corso, “and we had such a happy day the first time I wore that suit, that now whenever I put it on, I feel good in it. I feel powerful.”

Lauren Manaker, 37, from South Carolina, always smiles whenever she slips on the black silk Elie Tahari dress that her mother bought her when she was 22, which has become her go-to LBD.

“I still have sticker shock — it was $500 — but my mom said it was an investment,” Manaker told Moneyish. “I was finishing grad school, and it was my first grown-up dress.

It makes me feel classic and put-together — and it still fits! I wear it to weddings and charity functions, and I just accessorize it differently every time.”

While there was once stigma attached to wearing the same thing on repeat, today’s shoppers are more concerned with sustainability — not to mention practicality.

“In Hollywood, no one ever wants to wear the same thing on the red carpet, but they’re not paying for it, and they’re not storing it in their closets.

This is how real people live,” celebrity stylist and “The Shopping Diet: Spend Less and Get More” author Phillip Bloch told Moneyish.

So if you’ve found that perfect suit or dress that makes you feel a million bucks when you put it on — you’re gonna wear it out.

Stephanie Seferian, who voices The Sustainable Minimalists podcast, used to have a closet full of fancy dresses for weddings or other occasions, but soon found herself just wearing the same one or two because they looked and felt the best. “So I got rid of the ones I wasn’t wearing, and I just dress up or down the ones that I , and accessorize to the occasion,” Seferian, 33, from Boston told Moneyish.

But even as the stigma has lifted, social media has complicated things. Women used to get away with wearing the same dress to many events because they were being seen by different people, and they often weren’t being photographed. But now #OOTD has outed many of them.

Kristin Contino splurged on a $278 black, beaded Betsey Johnson slip dress embroidered with pink flowers 15 years ago for her sorority formal when she was 21. “It made me feel special and grown up …

and frankly, it was so my budget at the time, there was no way I wasn't wearing that thing to death!” Contino, now 37, who writes the Royally Broke blog, told Moneyish.

“But this was the era before social media, so it’s not everyone was seeing pictures of me in it.”

Kristin Contino splurged $278 on this Betsey Johnson slip dress.

But stylist Bloch told Moneyish that you can make social media work for you in rewearing pieces. “Instagram is a great diary of our wardrobes,” he said. “We can go on and see how we wore something last, and make sure we style it differently next time.”

So how do you pull off wearing the same piece repeatedly? First, it needs to be a quality piece that can hold up to being worn a million times, made with stronger stitching and from finer fabrics (cotton, wool, linen or silk, for example) that feel soft and substantial.

You also want to pick something timeless — a classic silhouette ( an A-line or sheath) in a neutral color (black, white, navy, gray, nude) — that will never go style.

Plus, something simple is more of a canvas for the accessories, so it’s almost forgettable.

You can wear that black sheath repeatedly, but with different jewelry, shoes, a hat or a wrap, no one will recognize it as the same dress.

Contino has worn a $50 blue wrap dress from Modcloth for professional photos, baptisms, bridal and baby showers because it is so versatile.

“It has three-quarter sleeves so it’s really comfortable year-round, and I can wear it with a denim jacket in spring and fall, with tights and a sweater in the winter, with flip flops in the summer, you name it,” she said.

“I know that it looks great on me, it's comfortable and photographs well, so why reinvent the wheel?”

ALSO READ: This is the secret to dressing for success

An evening gown or something in a bold pattern or color on the other hand — Contino’s beaded Betsey Johnson dress — is harder to repeat because it is so memorable.

Bloch suggests spacing it out — maybe only wearing it twice a year, or every other year — and switching up the rest of your look entirely: wear different shoes, different jewelry, carry a different bag, and if your hair was up or down, wear it the opposite way.

And suit pieces or individual pieces are much easier to repeat, because you can mix and match them with other pieces. “I just helped a client pick out this beautiful black Chanel skirt that she will wear forever and ever, and she’ll never get tired of,” he said.

“Or, you think you can’t wear your wedding dress again — but what if you take that dress, dye it, and cut it in half? It will be much easier to wear that again as a skirt and a top.

You spent a lot of money on that dress, so find a way to repurpose it and get more use it.”

This article was originally published on Mary 11, 2018 and has been updated following the royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle.

See original version of this story

Source: https://www.marketwatch.com/amp/story/guid/475c2b0d-8269-4ed1-8a1c-38a9fb5349fe

Bride spends EIGHT months and just $70 crocheting her wedding dress

She Crocheted Her Stunning Wedding Dress Herself for Just $30... Find Out How

Published: 20:49 BST, 16 November 2015 | Updated: 23:47 BST, 16 November 2015

A bride who longed to wear a vintage-inspired wedding gown spent eight months – and a mere $70 – crocheting the dress of her dreams after she was unable to find the perfect gown to suit her tastes and her budget in stores.

While dress shopping, Abbey Ramirez-Bodley, 22, from Tulsa, Oklahoma, found that the bridal gowns she d were 'outrageously expensive'. But when she came across a woman who made a dress of crocheted doilies, she showed the picture to her aunt, Jennifer Wollard, who her taught her how to crochet when she was four or five, to see if they could create a wedding dress the same way. 

'Everybody loved it,' Abbey told ABC News of the finished product, which she wore for her October 27 nuptials. 'A few people kept my aunt tied up all night asking questions about it.'

Something new: Abbey Ramirez-Bodley, 22, from Tulsa, Oklahoma, crocheted her wedding gown using 'two miles and 1,400 yards of yarn'

Savings plan: The bride spent a mere $70 on yarn, however, her project took eight months to complete

However, the design process was far from easy. Abbey explained that she and her aunt didn't have a pattern to work with, so there was 'a lot of guesswork' when they were creating the gown, which was completely hand sewn. 

The two women started the project by making individual handmade crocheted doilies before meeting and piecing them together, starting with skirt and moving up to the top. 

Abbey and Jennifer had to 'improvise the band' to give the dress shape, and when it started getting to heavy, they had to come up with a creative solution to give the gown more stability. 

Unforgettable day: Abbey and her now-husband Jake Bodley said 'I do' on October 27 

Unique touch: The bride walked down the aisle carrying a bouquet of fall leaves instead of flowers

Jennifer ended up using a see-through fabric to give the dress more of a base, however, both women agree that the sleeves were the most difficult portion of the dress to complete.  

“The sleeves were a nine-hour day,' Abbey said. 'The bad thing about that was I had already crocheted all the doilies. But figuring out how to lay them around the armpit and getting the right length was hard. 

'It was really hard. It was the longest stretch we sat down together and worked on it.'

Family collaboration: Abbey and her aunt Jennifer Wollard, who taught her how to crochet when she was a child, teamed up to create the gown of her dreams 

Elaborate plan: The two created the hand sewn dress  crocheted doilies that they made and pieced together 

Putting in the time: Abbey and her aunt agreed that the hardest part of the project was making the sleeves, which took about nine hours 

Creating the dress took eight months and 'two miles and 1,400 yards of yarn' to make, and Abbey explained that she made it a point to take the yards and convert them into miles a natural curiosity.  

'Once you invest so much time in that, you want to know. I don’t want people to think this is something we just whipped up in no time,' she noted. 'Without a pattern it was really difficult. We were just as amazed as everybody else.' 

However, Abbey said the entire project only cost her about $70 worth of yarn because she had 'a lot of coupons'.  

Moment of doubt: Abbey admitted that her husband didn't think she would be able to create a dress that she would want to wear on her wedding day 

Start of it all: Abbey explained that she had wanted a vintage-inspired dress, but all the gowns that she d were too expensive 

'I do': After doing some research, Abbey came across a photo of a woman who crocheted a short, sleeveless dress and took it to her aunt to see if they could make their own 

According to the bride, her homemade gown made quite the impression as her guests pored over the intricate detail that she and her aunt put into the design. 

And while Abbey's now-husband Jake Bodley knew she was working on the dress, she admitted that he didn't believe they would be able to create a design that would work for their wedding.   

'He was amazed by the final piece of it,' she said of the big reveal. 'But anybody that knows me knows that I would choose this over a bought dress.'

Pleasant surprise: Even though he knew she was working on it, Abbey said her husband was 'amazed' by the final design 

Making it work: 'We were just as amazed as everybody else,' Abbey said of her and her aunt's reaction to her completed gown 

Fan favorite: Abbey, who can be seen kissing her new husband, said her wedding guests loved her intricately detailed gown 

Source: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3320742/Bride-spends-EIGHT-months-just-70-crocheting-dream-wedding-dress-took-two-miles-yarn-create.html

A bride tried on 6 dresses before finding the one, but then she had to postpone her wedding

She Crocheted Her Stunning Wedding Dress Herself for Just $30... Find Out How
captionSabina Leybold found her wedding dress at a sample store.sourceSabina Leybold

  • Sabina Leybold and Harsh Bhargav planned to get married in March 2020.
  • In January, Leybold began shopping for a wedding dress online that wasn’t too formal and would fit with Bhargav’s Indian culture.
  • After trying on six dresses at a sample store, Leybold picked a fitted gown with crochet details, but then she had to postpone the wedding because of the coronavirus.
  • Leybold and Bhargav took pictures in their wedding attire with their photographer before they had to self-isolate, allowing them to honor their original wedding date.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Sabina Leybold and Harsh Bhargav didn’t expect to each other

captionThe couple met on a dating app.

Leybold, 23, and Bhargav, 24, met on a dating app in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, early in 2019.

“Neither of us was super excited about the first date,” Leybold told Insider. But they decided to meet up anyway, and they were surprised to find themselves quickly enamored with one another.

They ended up seeing each other three more times that week.

“We’ve basically been inseparable ever since,” Leybold said.

The couple got engaged in January 2020

captionThey planned to get married in March 2020.

The proposal didn’t come as a surprise, as Leybold and Bhargav had already talked about getting married in March 2020.

“We picked our venue the day before he proposed,” Leybold said.

“We’re both pretty low-maintenance,” she added. “Neither of us wanted a big, huge wedding.”

The couple planned a small wedding of around thirty guests for March, with Bhargavr’s family, who are based in India, planning to fly to the US for the nuptials.

Leybold started looking for a wedding dress a week after she got engaged

captionLeybold didn’t want a fancy wedding dress.

Since the wedding would take place only two months after the proposal, she didn’t have much time to shop.

Leybold planned on wearing a white cocktail dress rather than a wedding gown, as she thought it would go better with her laid-back vibe.

“I wanted something that was comfortable,” she said of her vision for a dress. “That was my number one priority while shopping. One that felt comfortable and let me move around.”

That immediately ruled out a strapless dress for Leybold, as the style didn’t sound comfortable to her.

Leybold also knew she wanted her dress to coordinate with the sherwani Bhargav would wear

captionLeybold wanted her dress to go with Bhargav’s outfit.sourceSwiger Photography

Bhargav wanted to honor his Indian culture with his wedding ensemble, so he planned to wear a traditional sherwani to the wedding.

“I chose not to also wear something Indian,” Leybold said. “It’s not my background, and it wasn’t necessarily something that I saw myself in.”

“I still wanted to have more of an American-style wedding dress, but I wanted to have something that would look good with what he was wearing.”

With that in mind, Leybold started shopping for dresses online with a loose budget of $500.

Leybold started shopping by ordering three dresses from Nordstrom to try on at home

captionLeybold first shopped online.sourceSabina Leybold

She planned to try on the dresses and return anything she didn’t .

Leybold initially d the first gown she tried on, a $295 Shona Joy maxi dress. It was comfortable and looked bridal without being over the top.

But Bhargav had seen the dress online when Leybold was shopping, and he wasn’t crazy about it.

“I knew that he didn’t really love it, so that was in the back of my mind a little bit,” Leybold said. But the real deal-breaker was that the dress didn’t feel it was unique enough to be her wedding dress.

“Ultimately, I have another dress that’s not white that looks that, and that doesn’t feel special enough.”

The second gown was supposed to be a white midi dress, but Leybold’s height made it shorter than she anticipated

captionThis gown was too short.sourceSabina Leybold

The $198 Dress The Population gown had a cinched waist and sweetheart neckline, and when Leybold saw it online, she loved the mid-calf length it was supposed to have.

Leybold said she thought it was “the dress” when she first saw it on the website.

“But on the model in the picture, it was midi-length, and I’m so tall that it’s a knee-length dress.”

“I d it. It just wasn’t what I was expecting,” she said.

The search continued.

Leybold thought this gown was pretty, but it wasn’t as comfortable as she was hoping it would be

captionThe gown’s straps weren’t comfortable.sourceSabina Leybold

The $271 Dessy Collection gown was the most formal of the dresses she ordered.

While Leybold d the straight silhouette it created, the off-the-shoulder straps prevented her from lifting her arms, which wouldn’t work for her wedding.

“I couldn’t move my arms, so that wasn’t going to happen,” she said.

After trying on the more casual dresses at home, Leybold realized she did want a more formal wedding gown.

“You can wear a white dress any old day, but something as formal as a bridal gown is meant to at least be a once-in-a-lifetime thing,” she told Insider.

So Leybold headed to a bridal shop with one friend to try on dresses

captionThis dress didn’t feel right.sourceSabina Leybold

She went to The Sample Rack in Philadelphia, which only has sample dresses. The gowns can’t be custom ordered, and there’s often only one of each gown in a size in the store, so it’s important to buy a dress you quickly.

“They are on the lower end price-wise, but are still a higher-end type dress,” Leybold said of the dresses in the store.

Leybold tried on this A-line gown first, drawn to the tiered lace design on the skirt. Although it was pretty, she didn’t love the dress.

“I don’t know what it was about it,” she said. “It just didn’t really feel right. I think I was uncomfortable in it.”

Leybold was surprised to find herself drawn to this princess-style ball gown

captionThe princess gown surprised Leybold.sourceSabina Leybold

“I was surprised that I d it,” Leybold said of the ball gown, which had beaded detailing on the bodice and a tulle skirt.

“It does feel very American princess wedding, not this ‘mishmash of cultures’ vibe” that she was hoping to find in a gown, Leybold explained.

“And it was going to need a lot more alterations,” she added. “It was too small, so the back would need to be entirely redone.”

Leybold said that sounded risky and it would cost a lot of money.

“It didn’t have the right feeling, and I also wasn’t emotionally attached to it. I wasn’t going to be emotionally upset if that dress was gone,” Leybold said.

But when she tried on this fitted gown, Leybold knew she found something special

captionThe fitted gown was special.sourceSabina Leybold

The fitted Willowby By Watters dress had a V-shaped neckline and geometric crochet detailing throughout the gown.

Leybold loved the pattern detailing on the gown in particular. It “felt it could toe the line” between Leybold and Bhargav’s cultures, as she put it.

The dress was approximately $1,200, which was more than double Leybold’s original $500 budget.

“Besides our photographer, my dress is the most expensive thing happening at our wedding,” Leybold said.

The gown also had a dynamic shape on the back that Leybold was drawn to

captionThe back had a unique design.sourceSabina Leybold

She was torn between this gown and the princess-style dress, so she wanted to sleep on her decision.

But then Leybold’s shopping companion asked her how she would feel if someone else bought the gown, preventing her from getting it since there was only one version of the dress in her size at the store.

She realized she’d be devastated if the dress was gone, so she decided to buy it that day.

The gown needed a few alterations after Leybold bought it

captionLeybold removed the gown’s train.sourceSwiger Photography

Because the dress was a sample, it didn’t fit Leybold exactly right when she bought it.

First, it needed to be taken in and the straps needed to be shortened. “It probably would’ve been better if it was down a size, but luckily that’s a pretty easy alteration to make,” Leybold said.

But the biggest alteration was removing the gown’s train, which pained Leybold to do.

“Our venue is very small, we’re only having thirty people, and comfort is so important to me, so I don’t want to have a train,” she said.

“I’m going to be tripping over it all night or I’d have to carry it around, or someone else is going to step on it because our venue is so small.”

“It was too bad because I really thought it was beautiful. I was distraught,” she added.

As the March wedding date approached, Leybold and Bhargav realized they wouldn’t be able to have their event as planned because of the coronavirus

captionThe couple had to postpone their wedding.sourceSwiger Photography

They realized it was time to postpone on March 15.

Both of their companies implemented work-from-home policies, and travel restrictions were starting to be put in place, which was a problem because Bhargav’s family planned on flying to Pennsylvania from India.

They postponed the wedding to October, though they planned to get married at home in the spring of 2020 anyway, thanks to Pennsylvania’s self-uniting wedding option, which allowed the couple to get married without an officiant.

“It’s nice that we had the power to do whatever felt right for our relationship,” Leybold said.

A few days after they postponed the wedding, Bhargav got the idea to have a photo shoot in their wedding attire before the couple had to self-isolate

captionThe couple had a photoshoot in their wedding attire.sourceSwiger Photography

“I think we were both mourning the loss of the celebration,” Leybold said. “We knew it was the right decision, but it was a sad decision.”

Bhargav suggested they see if their photographer could spend an hour or two with them from a distance before they had to totally self-isolate. They hoped it would make the postponement a little less upsetting.

The shoot would give them a way to celebrate what should have been their wedding day

captionThe couple planned to hang photos from the day when they signed their wedding papers.sourceSwiger Photography

Bhargav also pointed out that they could hang the photos in their house on the day they signed their wedding papers to make it feel more of an event.

“I would have never thought to do that,” Leybold said of the photo shoot

captionThe shoot made the day feel special.sourceSwiger Photography

“I’m really glad he suggested it because it was an extra special day,” Leybold said of her now-husband’s idea.

The day was also fun because Leybold had a pre-existing relationship with their photographer, Amanda Swiger, as she had previously done a boudoir shoot with her.

“She’s hilarious,” Leybold said of her photographer.

The couple had a blast taking pictures together

captionThe photo shoot gave them a reason to be happy.sourceSwiger Photography

“Amanda was just , ‘Sometimes I have couples who don’t really want to be affectionate on camera or grooms who aren’t really into it,'” Leybold said.

But Bhargav was just as excited to be there as his soon-to-be wife, and he had no trouble showing his love for Leybold.

Leybold said the shoot was more fun because it felt a bit the last hurrah

captionThe shoot brought the couple joy.sourceSwiger Photography

“Knowing that we were going to be isolated for a few weeks, you know?” she added.

“It was a beautiful day in Philly, and there was just this resounding feeling of we’re all doing our best right now.”

“It was just the embodiment of that for sure,” she said.

The couple officially got married in their home on April 11, 2020

captionThe couple got married at home.sourceSwiger Photography

Some friends signed their wedding license for them from a distance, and they FaceTimed their families when they signed it themselves, making it feel they were there.

“If self-quarantine can’t stop us, nothing can stop us,” Leybold wrote on Instagram about the wedding.

You can follow her here.

Source: https://www.businessinsider.sg/bride-tried-on-6-wedding-dresses-before-finding-the-one-2020-4-2

California man makes stunning wedding dress toilet paper

She Crocheted Her Stunning Wedding Dress Herself for Just $30... Find Out How
CLOSE

Michael Costello and the Stars of “Project Runway” show at Fashion Week El Paseo in Palm Desert. (March 21, 2017)

A California costume designer has found another use for toilet paper and it has nothing to do with personal hygiene.

Frank Cazares, 29, a costume designer with Dezart Performs and Coyote Stageworks, has created a stunning wedding dress 53 rolls of Quilted Northern Ultra Soft & Strong toilet paper.

The ombre gold wedding dress resembles crocheted vintage lace rather than toilet tissue and and is a finalist in the annual National TP Wedding Dress Contest.  That means his creation is one of 10 dresses selected from thousands of entries nationwide vying for a grand prize of $10,000. Second place wins $5,000 and third place $2,500.

More: Balenciaga sewed a button-down shirt onto a T-shirt and people aren't having it

Cazares’ toilet paper dress is called Esperanza, which means hope in Spanish and is inspired by his grandmother by the same name. 

“For my first gift as a newborn, my grandmother crocheted me a blanket and so I wanted to mimic that design in the dress,” he said. 

The competition also has a fan favorite category with a prize of $1,000. This is where the public and those who want to support Cazares get to vote for their favorite dress by going to tpdresscontest.com.

If he wins the grand prize, he said he plans to go back to fashion school and pursue bridal wear. 

Frank Cazares from Palm Springs is a finalist in the 14th Annual Toilet Paper Wedding Dress Contest. (Photo: Courtesy photo.)

“I'm a big supporter of sustainable fashion so that’s one thing I’m also trying to work with,” he said.  “I'm trying to use more recyclables to make more fashion couture gowns or pieces.”

More: Serena's 'Wakanda-inspired' bodysuit about more than fashion

His toilet paper dress features 1,000 little flowers individually cut and sewn together to create the bohemian look. He also used 10,000 yards of different tones of gold thread to sew it. 

Frank Cazares from Palm Springs made this dress 53 rolls of Quilted Northern toilet paper. It is a finalist in the 14th Annual Toilet Paper Wedding Dress Contest. (June 2018) (Photo: Courtesy photo.)

In addition to the toilet paper, contestants are only able to use glue, tape and needle and thread. They cannot use buttons or zippers or hooks and eyes, which adds to the challenge.

Since his dress has a crocheted see-through look, Cazares used nude medical tape as the lining. The look also includes an elaborate and delicate looking flower headpiece with roses and lilies inspired by Frida Kahlo and the strength of Latina women.  

“This year I did challenge myself to make something that was very wearable and that had a flow,” he said. “It's hard to reinvent yourself every year. Every year you just try to be different.”

More: How prom fashion has evolved from ubiquitous gowns to include DIY and gender fluid options

This is the fifth time he’s entered the contest and the fourth time he’s made it to the top 10. He’s never won, though.

Cazares and the other top 10 designers will travel to New York City to participate in a fashion show finale on June 20 at Kleinfeld Bridal. Fan favorite voting closes at 9 p.m. on June 18.

Frank Cazares from Palm Springs made a dress and this floral headpiece 53 rolls of Quilted Northern toilet paper. It is a finalist in the 14th Annual Toilet Paper Wedding Dress Contest. (June 2018) (Photo: Courtesy photo.)

During the finale in New York each design will be evaluated by a panel of judges that include: Mara Urshel, owner of Kleinfeld Bridal; Danielle Jonas, reality television personality and wife of Joe Jonas;  and representatives of Cheap Chic Weddings and Quilted Northern.

Cazares said he's always been a crafty person and is inspired by cinema.

More: The early '00s are back and you're going to want to stock up on tube tops and spaghetti straps

“The movie the 'Wizard of Oz' inspired me to be creative and think outside the box. So I really look up to cinematography and creating a look for movies and theater. That’s how it stared,” he said. 

He looks forward to being in New York and seeing all the other competitors in person – many are return contestants him —  but hopes his is the one that hold's up in the end.

“It's inspiring to see everyone else's work.  I call them my toilet paper family,” he said.

Follow Xochitl Pena on  @TDSXochitl

Read or Share this story: https://usat.ly/2sK87G3

Source: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2018/06/10/california-man-wedding-dress-toilet-paper/688794002/

These stunning wedding dresses are made toilet paper (yes, really!)

She Crocheted Her Stunning Wedding Dress Herself for Just $30... Find Out How

Here comes the bride, all dressed in … two-ply?

Creative designers around the country are vying for the top prize in the 14th Annual Toilet Paper Wedding Dress Contest, organized by the wedding website Cheap Chic Weddings in partnership with Quilted Northern.

Dressmakers were tasked with creating a wearable, on-trend wedding gown and headpiece using only Quilted Northern toilet paper, glue, tape and needle and thread.

Ronaldo Cruz, a florist by trade, designed this unbelievable gown. CheapChicWeddings.com

More than 1,500 people around the country submitted entries. The top 10 finalists were recently announced, and their creations are this world.

Susan Brennan, a yoga instructor from Orchard Lake, Michigan, made a stunning dress with floral detailing that would not look place at a couture bridal shop.

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How is this dress made of toilet paper?CheapChicWeddings.com

Meanwhile, actress and singer Kari Curletto made a stunning, princess-style gown with unbelievable craftsmanship.

Kari Curletto of Las Vegas made a toilet paper gown fit for a princess.CheapChicWeddings.com

Curletto made a cage crinoline using only tape, glue and toilet paper, and she “spun 1,600 feet of Quilted Northern to make the fine, see-through lace for the Mantilla veil.”

“I used a modified power tool as my DIY spindle,” she added in a statement.

Wedding dress made toilet paper blows Hoda away!

June 19, 201501:26

The first-place winner of the contest will win $10,000 and the second- and third-place winners will receive $5,000 and $2,000, respectively. The winner of a fan voting competition will also take home $1,000.

Susan Nicholson of Kennesaw, Georgia, outdid herself with this Cinderella-style gown.CheapChicWeddings.com

“We are in constant awe of these artfully crafted dresses year after year and hope to continue to inspire brides both past and present with these couture creations,” Susan Bain, the co-founder of Cheap Chic Weddings, said in a release.

This is the first time Chae Rim of Centerville, Ohio, has entered the contest.CheapChicWeddings.com

Some of the contestants this year are first-time entrants, while others have entered multiple times in the past.

Donna Vincler won the grand prize in 2015, and she’s back with this incredible floral masterpiece. CheapChicWeddings.com

August Manzanares has entered three times, and has also reached the top 10 three times.

“Using unconventional materials to create fashion is one of my favorite things to do as it shows that fashion is a world without limits or rules,” said designer Augusto Manzanares.CheapChicWeddings.com

“I am a designer who loves to work with unconventional materials toilet paper,” the New York City-based designer said in a statement. “I wanted to create and challenge myself in making the illusion of a lace fabric and making it more flexible to be more comfortable for a person to wear.”

Julie Haas of Stockton, Illinois, thought outside the box when she designed this blue and pink gown. This is her fourth year in the top 10.

Julie Haas of Stockton, Illinois, used pastel blue and pink toilet paper to create this masterpiece.CheapChicWeddings.com

And designer Frank Cazares outdid himself with this intricately woven dress and headpiece.

Frank Cazares of Palm Springs, California, used unbelievable craftsmanship to create this TP gown. CheapChicWeddings.com

Finally, Mimoza Haska made this unbelievable gown inspired by spring.

The detailing is unbelievable in this dress from Mimoza Haska of Surfside Beach, South Carolina.

“It’s a corset top and three-layered, princess-style bottom,” Haska explained in a statement. “The top layer is lace.”

The grand prize winner won’t be announced until June 20, when the finalists will display their creations at a fashion show event at New York's famed Kleinfeld Bridal. But it’s safe to say all these designers are … on a roll!

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Source: https://www.today.com/style/meet-10-finalists-year-s-toilet-paper-wedding-dress-contest-t130222