How Do I Know If I Have IED?

Can adults be diagnosed with intermittent explosive disorder?

IED is a psychiatric disorder that affects approximately 5% of adults.

IED is characterized by recurrent behavioral outbursts representing a failure to control aggressive impulses.

Adults with IED have low frustration tolerances and are disproportionately enraged by small annoyances..

What is the best medication for IED?

There are no specific medications for IED, but certain medications may help to reduce impulsive behavior or aggression. These include: antidepressants, in particular selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) mood stabilizers, including lithium, valproic acid, and carbamazepine.

Does intermittent explosive disorder get better with age?

Intermittent explosive disorder is a chronic disorder that can continue for years, although the severity of outbursts may decrease with age. Treatment involves medications and psychotherapy to help you control your aggressive impulses.

Is IED genetic?

Genetic: Intermittent explosive disorder is believed to be hereditary for some people. Especially in those with a first-degree relative who suffers from this condition, research has concluded that some individuals have a genetic predisposition to the development of IED.

Why do I get mad for no reason?

Some common anger triggers include: personal problems, such as missing a promotion at work or relationship difficulties. a problem caused by another person such as cancelling plans. an event like bad traffic or getting in a car accident.

Can kids have IED?

Kids with intermittent explosive disorder (IED) exhibit short episodes of intense, uncontrollable anger or aggression with very little or no apparent cause. It usually shows up in late childhood or adolescence, and eventually leads to a higher risk of self-harm or suicide in adolescents and young adults.

Is IED a mental disorder?

Intermittent explosive disorder is a lesser-known mental disorder marked by episodes of unwarranted anger. It is commonly described as “flying into a rage for no reason.” In an individual with intermittent explosive disorder, the behavioral outbursts are out of proportion to the situation.

How common is IED?

Depending upon how broadly it’s defined, intermittent explosive disorder (IED) affects as many as 7.3 percent of adults — 11.5-16 million Americans — in their lifetimes.

What triggers IED?

Exposure to violence and aggression during childhood, going through traumatic experiences, or being the victim of abuse and/or neglect are examples of some environmental factors that could bring about intermittent explosive disorder symptoms. Risk Factors: Being male.

How do you deal with intermittent explosive disorder?

Work with your doctor or mental health professional to develop a plan of action for when you feel yourself getting angry. For example, if you think you might lose control, try to remove yourself from that situation. Go for a walk or call a trusted friend to try to calm down. Improving self-care.

How do I stop rage outbursts?

Here are 25 ways you can control your anger:Count down. Count down (or up) to 10. … Take a breather. Your breathing becomes shallower and speeds up as you grow angry. … Go walk around. Exercise can help calm your nerves and reduce anger. … Relax your muscles. … Repeat a mantra. … Stretch. … Mentally escape. … Play some tunes.More items…•

What is bipolar rage?

“Bipolar anger is impulsive, intense, erratic, and explosive. It is being asked a simple question and responding with irrational anger and/or irritation. It is lashing out, for no logical reason, on those that love and care for you.

Can IED be cured?

While there is no cure for IED, you can gain control over the symptoms with proper rehab. There are inpatient treatment programs designed specifically to meet the needs of people suffering from intermittent explosive disorder.

What mental illness causes rage outbursts?

Intermittent explosive disorder (IED) is an impulse-control disorder characterized by sudden episodes of unwarranted anger. The disorder is typified by hostility, impulsivity, and recurrent aggressive outbursts. People with IED essentially “explode” into a rage despite a lack of apparent provocation or reason.